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Things to do

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Trip ideas

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Vancouver Itinerary

1

Coal Harbour & Canada Place

Canada Place is picture-perfect for photo-ops, and a great place to relax and watch cruise ships glide into the city. At its tip is FlyOver Canada, a breathtaking flight simulation ride. Coal Harbour’s big attraction is the view, Seawall and the laidback atmosphere. On the waterfront next to the LEED Platinum-certified Vancouver Convention Centre, stop at Jack Poole Plaza for a selfie with the 2010 Olympic Cauldron.

2

Gastown

A National Historic Site of Canada and the city’s oldest neighbourhood, heritage buildings have recently been colonized with cool designer stores and some of the city’s best bars. The district’s dining scene that has really taken off in recent years with cutting edge new restaurants – stroll the streets here for unique sushi, charcuterie, Pacific Northwest, Asian fusion, cool cocktail bars and craft beer pubs, and hipster diners.

3

Chinatown

With its vivid colours, exotic cuisine and a vibrant culture, Vancouver's Chinatown is rich in history and architecture.  Just to the east of downtown, this is North America's third-largest Chinatown after New York and San Francisco. Highlights include the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden, the Sam Kee Building (world's narrowest commercial building) and the Chinese Cultural Centre.

4

Robson Street

Head to Robson Street for shopping, strolling and people-watching. Here there is everything from big-name stores to luxury boutiques on Alberni street. The main action is concentrated from the Pacific Centre shopping mall, with Nordstrom Flagship store to Jervis Street, where stores, coffee shops and restaurants line every inch of space along the sidewalk.

5

Yaletown

This waterfront community has experienced major revitalization since its rebirth as host of Expo '86. Formerly a warehouse district where textile shops and train yards provided little in the way of beauty or entertainment, Yaletown has been transformed into one of Vancouver's hippest areas, filled with sidewalk cafes, trendy restaurants, a thriving nightlife scene and intimate boutique hotels.

6

Granville Island

Culinary adventurers gravitate toward this bustling foodie centre to sample artisan products and multicultural influences. The Island’s flagship is the bustling Granville Island Public Market, where exotic produce and gourmet ingredients are sold alongside global dishes and local specialties. On the Island there are many restaurants, artists’ studios, theatre, breweries and independent shops.

7

Kitsilano

Known as “Kits”, one of the city’s most desirable older neighbourhoods, it is home to Kitsilano Beach, Vanier Park, Vancouver’s largest outdoor pool and a 4th Avenue thoroughfare of browsable shops and popular eateries. Kits is one of the city’s best summertime haunts overlooking the classic Vancouver skyline of sea, Stanley Park and the North Shore mountains.

8

The West End

Stretching from Coal Harbour to English Bay, with Stanley Park on one side and Burrard Street on the other, the West End’s tree-lined boulevards, diverse restaurants and independent shops serve a population of young people and seniors in a largely adult-focussed area of the city. This is one of the most densely populated areas in all of Canada.

9

Stanley Park

Lush Stanley Park is the city’s cherished emerald jewel with evergreen forests, cricket pitches, rose gardens, totem poles and beaches. Visit Canada's largest aquarium and an array of can't-miss kid-friendly spots (including a pool, water park, miniature railway and more), this 400-hectare (1,000-acre) is recognized as one of the greatest urban parks in the world.

10

The North Shore

Comprising North Vancouver and West Vancouver and located in the shadow of the towering Coast Mountains, the North Shore is best accessed from the city via the Lions Gate Bridge or on a short SeaBus hop from Waterfront Station. Some of the area’s main attractions include North Van’s Lonsdale Quay Public Market, Capilano Suspension Bridge Park and Grouse Mountain.

11

Vancouver International Airport

Vancouver International Airport - a modern, award winning facility. Easily access downtown Vancouver via the Canada Line, or by taxi or rental car.

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VISA and Travel Info

The CAN+ Visa Program

Under the new CAN+ program, Indian nationals who have travelled to Canada or the United Stated within the last 10 years will be eligible for simpler and expedited visa processing.  If the travelers provide the evidence of the previous travel, no other supporting documentation will be required and CAN+ application will be processed in 5 working days or less. 

Same application, no additional cost, faster and less documentation.  For more information, please visit www.canadainternational.gc.ca/india-inde.

 

Passports & Visas FAQ

1. Do I need a passport to enter Canada?

International visitors to Canada who are not US citizens must carry a valid passport and visa (if required). Citizens from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Mexico, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Australia and others do not require a visa to enter Canada. Visit Citizenship and Immigration Canada online for a complete listing.

2. What are the requirements for children entering Canada?

If you are traveling with children, you must carry identification, such as a birth certificate, proof of citizenship or student visa for each child under 18 years old. Divorced parents who share custody of their children should carry copies of the legal custody documents and a letter of authorization from the other custodial parent allowing the child to be taken out of the country. Adults who are not parents or guardians must have written permission from the parents or guardians to accompany the children. When traveling with a group of vehicles, parents or guardians should travel in the same vehicle as the children for border crossing.

Customs officers are often looking for missing children and may ask questions about the children who are traveling with you.

3. New US passport rules will come into effect soon. Will these rules affect my trip to Canada?

Yes. As of Jan. 23, 2007, a new American law, the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI), requires anyone, including US citizens, entering or re-entering the United States by air to have a passport or a NEXUS card when used at a NEXUS kiosk at designated airports.

By June 1, 2009, anyone, including US citizens, entering or re-entering the United States by land and sea will need to have a passport or other appropriate, secure document.

Visit the U.S. Department of State website frequently for international travel updates.

4. When the new US passport rules come into effect, will my children require passports?

Currently, all children, regardless of age (including newborns and infants), must have their own passport to enter the United States by air. US travelers to Canada are reminded that divorced parents who share custody of their children should carry copies of the legal custody documents and a letter of authorization from the other custodial parent for children less than 18 years old. Adults who are not parents or guardians must have written permission from the parents or guardians to accompany the children. When traveling with a group of vehicles, parents or guardians should travel in the same vehicle as the children for border crossing.

 

For more information visit:

Countries Requiring Visas

Canadian Visa Offices

Canada International Website

Canada Border Services Agency

Immigration to Canada